How Do We Explain Moral Relativism?

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If no set of moral ideas were truer or better than any other,
there would be no sense in preferring civilized morality to
savage morality, or Christian morality to Nazi morality.
– C. S. Lewis

If all positions are of equal intellectual merit,
then cannibalism is only a matter of taste.
– Pope Benedict XVI

A system of morality which is bases on relative emotional values is a mere illusion, a thoroughly vulgar conception which has nothing sound in it and nothing true.
– Socrates

A writer who says that there are no truths, or that all truth is ‘merely relative,’ is asking you not to believe him. So don’t. Deconstruction deconstructs itself, and disappears up its own behind, leaving only a disembodied smile and a faint smell of sulphur.
– Roger Scruton

The assumption that all ideas are equally true is false. Philosophically it is very easy to demonstrate that falsity. Any society however sincere that believes in the equality of all ideas will pave the way for the loss of the good ones.
– Ravi Zacharias

If you depart from moral absolutes, you go into a bottomless pit. Communism and Nazism were catastrophic evils which both derived from moral relativism. Their differences were minor compared to their similarities.
– Paul Johnson

If relativism signifies contempt for fixed categories and those who claim to be the bearers of objective immortal truth, then there is nothing more relativistic than Fascist attitudes and activity. From the fact that all ideologies are of equal value, we Fascists conclude that we have the right to create our own ideology and to enforce it with all the energy of which we are capable.
– Benito Mussolini

No culture in history has ever embraced moral relativism and survived.
Our own culture, therefore, will either:
(1) be the first, and disprove history’s clearest lesson, or
(2) persist in its relativism and die, or
(3) repent of its relativism and live.
There is no other option.
– Peter Kreeft

Historical Evidence

01Do you believe in the existence of Socrates? Alexander the Great? Julius Caesar? If historicity is established by written records in multiple copies that date originally from near contemporaneous sources, there is far more proof for Christ’s existence than for any of theirs.

–Dinesh D’Souza,
What’s So Great About Christianity

Rousseau on Socrates and Jesus

JJ RouseauSocrates dies with honor, surrounded by his disciples listening to the most tender words -the easiest death that one could wish to die. Jesus dies in pain, dishonor, mockery, the object of universal cursing – the most horrible death that one could fear. At the receipt of the cup of poison, Socrates blesses him who could not give it to him without tears; Jesus, while suffering the sharpest pains, prays for His most bitter enemies. If Socrates lived and died like a philosopher, Jesus lived and died like a god.

–Jean-Jacques Rousseau,
French philosopher

The Messiah that defies explanation

Sermon_On_The_Mount_Copenhagen copy.jpg

If you had gone to Buddha and asked him: “Are you the son of Bramah?” he would have said, “My son, you are still in the vale of illusion.” If you had gone to Socrates and asked, “Are you Zeus?” he would have laughed at you. If you had gone to Mohammed and asked, “Are you Allah?” he would first have rent his clothes and then cut your head off. If you had asked Confucius, “Are you heaven?”, I think he would have probably replied, “Remarks which are not in accordance with nature are in bad taste.” The idea of a great moral teacher saying what Christ said is out of the question. In my opinion, the only person who can say that sort of thing is either God or a complete lunatic… He was never regarded as a mere moral teacher. He did not produce that effect on any of the people who actually met him. He produced mainly three effects – Hatred – Terror – Adoration. There was no trace of people expressing mild approval.

–C. S. Lewis,
God in the Dock

How do we explain such a life?

ChristCan the person whose history the Gospels relate be himself a man? What affecting goodness in his instructions! What sublimity in his maxims! What profound wisdom in his discourses! What presence of mind, what ingenuity of justice in his replies! Yes, if the life and death of Socrates are those of a philosopher, the life and death of Jesus are those of a God.

–Jean-Jacques Rousseau,
French philosopher (1712-1778)

No marks of fiction

1337544791Jewish authors would never have invented either that style nor that morality; and the Gospel has marks of truth so great, so striking, so utterly inimitable, that the invention of it would be more astonishing than the hero… Shall we suppose that the evangelical history is a mere fiction? Indeed it bears no marks of fiction; on the contrary, the history of Socrates, which no one presumes to doubt, is not so well attested to as that of Jesus Christ.

— Jean Jacques Rousseau