Tempted To Take The Leap

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When confronted with the order and beauty of the universe
and the strange coincidences of nature, it’s very tempting
to take the leap of faith from science into religion. I am sure
many physicists want to. I only wish they would admit it.

–Physicist Tony Rothman,
Former post-doctoral fellow at Oxford University

When atheists ask for proof

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Dear Atheist friend,

Your demand for proof raises a problem. “Proof” is not a part of your worldview, and asking for it undermines your argument.

Honest atheism does not admit the existence of any absolute standard, any true point of reference. Everything is governed by chaos; the universe is only stardust randomly bumping into stardust. Within a consistent, atheistic paradigm nothing could ever be truly known or proven.

The idea of “proof” belongs to the worldview of those who believe in a Supreme Creator who has put order, logic, consistency, and structure into the universe. A believer in a wise, all knowing Creator can think in terms of “proof” and “evidence,” but not a person who sees the universe as a random collision of particles.

Your request presupposes something you don’t believe in. It borrows from the worldview you are trying to deny.

Your statement self-destructs.

Nice try.

 

The emergence of science

john-lennoxThe goal of science is not to impose on the matter and workings of the universe or human sense of order, but to discover the universe’s own intrinsic order and intelligibility. And that means that scientists have always had to believe, before they start, that the universe has an inherent order. If it didn’t, scientific research would be pointless. “Men became scientific” says C. S. Lewis, “because they expected law in nature, and they expected law in nature because they believed in the Law Giver.”

–John Lennox

Breathing air that “doesn’t exist”

Imagine a person who . . . argues ‘no air exists’ but continues to breathe air while he argues. Now intellectually, atheists continue to breathe — they continue to use reason and draw scientific conclusions [which assumes an orderly universe], to make moral judgments [which assumes absolute values] — but the atheistic view of things would in theory make such ‘breathing’ impossible. They are breathing God’s air all the time they are arguing against him.

―Greg L. Bahnsen