The Myth of Equality

Equality 2

Aristotle stated that “the worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal.” I believe the great philosopher was on to something.

Equality is not a “one size fits all” proposition. “Nuts” and “bolts” are equally metallic—but they are not equal. “Straight” and “curved” are both shapes—but they are not equal. “Three” and “seven” are both numerals—but they are not equal. To speak of these things being “equal” is not particularly helpful. To enforce equality where it doesn’t exist is not only wrong but pernicious.

The voices that cry for equality are numerous. I think it’s time to rediscover the virtues of inequality—and to celebrate it.

376433-19827-15We need to applaud the fact that humans come in a variety of shapes and sizes: tall, short, plump, and thin. We do not have the same interests, aspirations, and dreams. We are of differing intelligence, appearance, creativity, and abilities.

Science clearly affirms that our genders are different. We are equal in dignity and worth, but this does not mean equivalency or alikeness. We are not interchangeable. Men and women are profoundly and marvelously different in a multitude of ways. We are not equally beautiful, tender, sensitive, intuitive, or strong. We are gloriously diverse.

We have different inclinations and strengths. Men are better suited to making houses, women do better at making homes. Engineering appeals more to men, and nursing is more attractive to women. That’s fine. Why try to force equality where there’s diversity? We need to accept the fact that we are not all equally good at the same things. There is contrast and complementarity. And it is beautiful.

A world of total equality would be insipid and dreary. To reduce everything to sameness, to eliminate contrast, to do away with difference is to get rid of that which makes life fascinating, exciting, and challenging. It turns everything gray. It all becomes bland.

True equality is about the dignity and worth of each person. It is not about sameness, identicalness, or interchangeability. When equality denies diversity it becomes absurdity.

It foolishly attempts to make unequal things equal.

–J. O. Schulz

Interchangeable Cogs?

cogs21Individuals, genders, and even whole ethnic groups do not always have the same interests, talents, backgrounds, or experiences and thus, they do not achieve the same outcomes. That doesn’t mean the system is unfair; it means that despite the fact that some people like to try to pretend that every American is just another interchangeable cog in a great wheel, we are each different. That’s why the government should get out of the quota business and allow everyone to rise or fall based on his own abilities and inclinations. If that means some people or groups are able to surpass others in certain areas, so be it; that’s life.

–John Hawkins,
10 Of The Greatest Pieces Of Conservative Wisdom

Rethinking diversity

Thomas SowellCan you cite one speck of hard evidence of the benefits of “diversity” that we have heard gushed about for years? Evidence of its harm can be seen — written in blood — from Iraq to India, from Serbia to Sudan, from Fiji to the Philippines. It is scary how easily so many people can be brainwashed by sheer repetition of a word.

― Thomas Sowell