Standing On The Threshold

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I tended at this stage to think of my Christian faith as a philosophy of life, not a religion. I had grasped something of its intellectual appeal but had yet to discover its imaginative, ethical and spiritual depths. I had a sense of standing on the threshold of something beautiful and amazing, which my reason had tantalizingly only grasped in part. Like Einstein, I realized that nature “shows us only the lions tail,” while hinting at the majesty and grandeur of the magnificent animal to which it is attached—and to which it ultimately leads.

–Alister McGrath,
University of Oxford Professor

Explaining Love, Heroism and Poetry

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Materialist atheism says we are just a collection of chemicals. It has no answer whatsoever to the question of how we should be capable of love or heroism or poetry if we are simply animated pieces of meat. The Resurrection, which proclaims that matter and spirit are mysteriously conjoined, is the ultimate key to who we are. It confronts us with an extraordinarily haunting story. J. S. Bach believed the story, and set it to music. Most of the greatest writers and thinkers of the past 1,500 years have believed it. But an even stronger argument is the way that Christian faith transforms individual lives—the lives of the men and women with whom you mingle on a daily basis, the man, woman, or child next to you in church tomorrow morning.

–A. N. Wilson,
“Religion of Hatred: Why We Should No Longer be Cowed by 
the Chattering Classes Ruling Britain Who Sneer at Christianity,”
U.N. Daily Mail (4-11-09)

Far beyond what we imagined

christ-dancing_heimo-christian-haikalaIt is startling to discover how many people there are who heartily dislike and despise Christianity without having the faintest notion what it is. If you tell them, they cannot believe . . . that anything so interesting, so exciting and so dramatic can be the orthodox creed of the Church.
        –Dorothy Sayer

A Detective Convinced by the Evidence

j-warner-wallaceI was a non-Christian until the age of thirty-five. I was often frustrated by the few Christians I knew on the police department because they weren’t able to respond evidentially to my skeptical (and often sarcastic) objections. I thought, “How can these folks who seem to have such high regard for evidence in their professional life, believe something about God for which they have no evidence at all?” I was similar to other atheists I knew at the time. I didn’t think there was any good evidence to support the claims of Christianity. The more I learned about the nature of evidence generally, and the more I learned about the evidence for Christianity specifically, the more convinced I became that the claims of the Gospels were true.

– J. Warner Wallace

Who are the closed-minded?

ThinkstockPhotos-487924444Often the person with spiritual convictions is seen as close-minded and others are seen as open-minded. What is fascinating to me is that at the center of the Christian faith is the assumption that this life isn’t all there is. That there is more to life than the material. That existence is not limited to what we can see, touch, measure, taste, hear, and observe. One of the central assertions of the Christian worldview is that there is “more” – Those who oppose this insist that this is all there is, that only what we can measure and observe and see with our eyes is real. There is nothing else. Which perspective is more “closed-minded?” Which perspective is more “open?”

― Rob Bell,
Velvet Elvis: Repainting the Christian Faith

The Insufferable Prison of Atheism

chinacross_001How is it that the country which most ruthlessly sought to eliminate religion in the last century is now poised to become the most Christian nation in the world? Approximately 65 million lives were eliminated in China last century in an unparalleled attempt to plant materialism firmly in the hearts of the Chinese people. It failed disastrously.

It is not known exactly how many Chinese Christians there are, but a conservative guess now estimates that there are at least 65 million Protestants in China and 12 million Catholics—more believers than there are members of the Communist Party. Some Chinese Christians think the number is well over one hundred million. Furthermore, China is now the biggest publisher of Bibles worldwide.

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The communist revolution was not exactly successful. To endeavor to imprison people within the narrow confines of a materialist worldview is a hopeless task. To claim that there is no supernatural order to the universe, that there is nothing beyond the four bare walls of the physical world is a hideous lie that ultimately will not stick.

People have an intrinsic need for meaning, for transcendence, for some kind of connection with the spiritual realm. It’s in our DNA. It’s written in our hearts. This inner thirst can never be satisfied by merely indulging our physical senses. There’s a longing within us that the material world cannot satisfy. The Bible describes it with these words: “He has also set eternity in the hearts” (Eccles. 3:11).

Religion is under attack in the West. Forces such as New Atheism have risen up to replace Christianity with a purely naturalistic worldview. China tried that and it failed (not to mention several other countries where the experiment also crashed and burned.) It didn’t work in the East, and it won’t work in the West. People simply cannot be contained in such a suffocating prison.

–J. O. Schulz

Are the Gospels Fiction?

Christ 99 copyI think one of the proofs of the Faith is that if the Gospels are fictitious, it is the most remarkable of fiction. Out of a rather brutal and coarse culture comes a story so sensitive, with such an insight into human nature, with so many allusions and interwoven symbols, with such drama and such lucid dialogue and surprising character development that there’s no explanation for it.

Even as fiction the Gospels are miraculous.

We don’t have fiction this complex and developed before the Gospels, and we don’t get anything close to them until Shakespeare, 1600 years later – and the atmosphere of his writing is directly inspired by these same Gospels. The Gospels make even the Old Testament look amateurish by comparison, as well as by comparison the modern “realistic” novels and problem plays seem hollow and fake.

So there is an argument for the truth of the Faith that is purely one of literary criticism, and it is a very strong argument.

–Kevin O’Brien,
http://americanchestertonsociety.blogspot.com/2007/03/dr-thursdays-thursday-post.html