How Do We Explain Moral Relativism?

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If no set of moral ideas were truer or better than any other,
there would be no sense in preferring civilized morality to
savage morality, or Christian morality to Nazi morality.
– C. S. Lewis

If all positions are of equal intellectual merit,
then cannibalism is only a matter of taste.
– Pope Benedict XVI

A system of morality which is bases on relative emotional values is a mere illusion, a thoroughly vulgar conception which has nothing sound in it and nothing true.
– Socrates

A writer who says that there are no truths, or that all truth is ‘merely relative,’ is asking you not to believe him. So don’t. Deconstruction deconstructs itself, and disappears up its own behind, leaving only a disembodied smile and a faint smell of sulphur.
– Roger Scruton

The assumption that all ideas are equally true is false. Philosophically it is very easy to demonstrate that falsity. Any society however sincere that believes in the equality of all ideas will pave the way for the loss of the good ones.
– Ravi Zacharias

If you depart from moral absolutes, you go into a bottomless pit. Communism and Nazism were catastrophic evils which both derived from moral relativism. Their differences were minor compared to their similarities.
– Paul Johnson

If relativism signifies contempt for fixed categories and those who claim to be the bearers of objective immortal truth, then there is nothing more relativistic than Fascist attitudes and activity. From the fact that all ideologies are of equal value, we Fascists conclude that we have the right to create our own ideology and to enforce it with all the energy of which we are capable.
– Benito Mussolini

No culture in history has ever embraced moral relativism and survived.
Our own culture, therefore, will either:
(1) be the first, and disprove history’s clearest lesson, or
(2) persist in its relativism and die, or
(3) repent of its relativism and live.
There is no other option.
– Peter Kreeft

How Do We Explain Hell?

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If you want your own way, God will let you have it.
Hell is the enjoyment of one’s own way forever.
– Dorothy Sayers

Atheism is a lack of belief in God? A mere absence?
Fair enough.
Hell is a lack God’s presence, the absence of God.
God is, in His way, a libertarian. Everyone gets to choose.
– Eve Keneinan

Hell is God’s great compliment to the reality of human freedom
and the dignity of human personality.
– G. K. Chesterton

One does not miss heaven by a hair, but by constant effort
to avoid and escape God.
– Dallas Willard

Only the gospel dares to proclaim that God enters smack-dab into the middle of the hell we create. Only the gospel dares to proclaim that God was born a baby in a bloody, crap-filled stable, that He lived a life befriending the prostitutes and lepers no one else would befriend, and that He suffered, firsthand, the hellish depth of all that is nightmarish in human existence.
– Gregory A. Boyd

Hell is when and where you know there’s a party going on, that
you were invited, and that you permanently declined.
– James A. Fowler

In the long run the answer to all those who object to the doctrine of hell, is… a question: “What are you asking God to do?” To wipe out their past sins and, at all costs, to give them a fresh start, smoothing every difficulty and offering every miraculous help? But He has done so, on Calvary. To forgive them? They will not be forgiven [editor: they will not accept God’s forgiveness]. To leave them alone? Alas, I am afraid that is what He does.
– C. S. Lewis

The question is not, “Why would a loving God send anyone to hell?”
The question is, “Why would anyone choose hell over a loving God?”

How Do We Explain The Human Brain?

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Supposing there was no intelligence behind the universe, no creative mind. In that case, nobody designed my brain for the purpose of thinking. It is merely that when the atoms inside my skull happen, for physical or chemical reasons, to arrange themselves in a certain way, this gives me, as a by-product, the sensation I call thought. But, if so, how can I trust my own thinking to be true? It’s like upsetting a milk jug and hoping that the way it splashes itself will give you a map of London. But if I can’t trust my own thinking, of course I can’t trust the arguments leading to Atheism, and therefore have no reason to be an Atheist, or anything else. Unless I believe in God, I cannot believe in thought: so I can never use thought to disbelieve in God.
― C. S. Lewis 

If everything is reducible to physics and chemistry, then so is your mind. And then, why would you trust your mind? In other words, atheism taken to its logical conclusion, undermines the very rationality you need to trust to do science. And I’m not in for accepting a worldview that undermines the foundations of any kind of argument or discussion whatsoever. So I think that, in the 21 century, we can push back on that very naive notion that God’s out, we do science now. Science actually brings God back in.
– John Lennox

It is idle to talk always of the alternative of reason and faith. Reason is itself a matter of faith. It is an act of faith to assert that our thoughts have any relation to reality at all.
– G. K. Chesterton

How Do We Explain This Emptiness?

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I can have all the money and cars in the world and be unhappy. Once you find out that money and fame and success doesn’t do it, where do you go then? That’s a big dilemma. I had all those things: A beautiful wife, cars, a home, money, friends. All the things that you think a man could need and it didn’t stop me drinking. I was depressed. I was suicidal.
–Eric Clapton

There remains deep in the soul (if I dare use that word) a persistent and unconscious anxiety that something is missing – some ingredient that makes life worth living.
– Prince Charles

Our lifelong nostalgia, our longing to be reunited with something in the universe from which we now feel cut off, to be on the inside of some door which we have always seen from the outside, is no mere neurotic fancy, but the truest index of our real situation.
– C. S. Lewis

Man was made for God; and without God, he is lonely.
– Billy Graham

How Do We Explain Injustice?

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My argument against God was that the universe seemed so cruel and unjust. But how had I got this idea of just and unjust? A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line. What was I comparing this universe with when I called it unjust? …Of course I could have given up my idea of justice by saying it was nothing but a private idea of my own. But if I did that, then my argument against God collapsed too—for the argument depended on saying that the world was really unjust, not simply that it did not happen to please my private fancies.

— C. S. Lewis,
Mere Christianity

How Do We Explain Jesus?

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A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic-on the level with the man who says he is a poached egg-or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or else a madman or something worse. You can shut Him up for a fool, you can spit at Him and kill Him as a demon; or you can fall at His feet and call Him Lord and God. But let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about His being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.

–C. S. Lewis

Our Lifelong Nostalgia

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Our lifelong nostalgia, our longing to be reunited with something
in the universe from which we now feel cut off, to be on the inside
of some door which we have always seen from the outside, is no mere neurotic fancy, but the truest index of our real situation.

– C. S. Lewis,
The Weight of Glory