How can people believe in a God they can’t see?

Bread Deniers

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The soul knows for certain only that it is hungry. . . .
A child does not stop crying if we suggest to him
that perhaps there is no bread.
It goes on crying just the same.

–Simone Weil

Wishful Thinking

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Sigmund Freud popularized the notion that belief in God is simply a projection of a deep-seated wish for protection, and that theists create God in their parent’s image. He insisted that God exists only in our minds, and he called upon people to grow up and give up the “fairy tales of religion.”

However, the wish-fulfillment argument works both ways. Who is to say that the atheist does not arrive at his belief in the non-existence of God because he wants no one to interfere with his life? He prizes his autonomy, and atheism appeals to his deep-seated wish to be left alone.

A person’s attitude toward God may well arise from a wish for or a wish against God’s existence.

And, far from ruling out the existence of something, “wishful thinking” may actually be evidence for its existence. C.S. Lewis argues: “Creatures are not born with desires unless satisfaction for those desires exists. A baby feels hunger: well, there is such a thing as food. A duckling wants to swim: well, there is such a thing as water. Men feel sexual desire: well, there is such a thing as sex. If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.”

Well known atheist, Stephen Hawking, declared, “Religion is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark.” It may well be the other way around—that atheism is a fairy story for people afraid of the light.

The refusal to acknowledge the existence of light does not remove the existence of the sun. We cannot blot it out. Those who dwell in darkness may choose to be obstinate, but it only makes the final inevitable encounter with reality highly unpleasant.

–J. O. Schulz

A Built-In Homing Instinct

Pigeons follow noses

Homing pigeons have long blown the minds of many with their uncanny ability to find their way home, even across great and disorienting distances. Their innate navigational skills are astounding. Someone jokingly said, “I just sold my homing pigeons on EBay… for the 22nd time.”

It has been suggested that if we could teach a homing pigeon about geography it would probably never arrive at its destination. Its inherent bird instincts are a far superior guide for finding its way to its nest.

Could instinctive faith be a more trustworthy compass for humans than cold rationalism? Although in a state of disrepair, could our basic intuition not point us the right way?  It appears that humans are naturally predisposed, or “wired” to believe in a supreme being. The New Testament declares that the divine law is inscribed upon human hearts (Rom. 2:15). Never has a tribe been discovered that did not have some kind of belief in the supernatural. A recognition of God seems to be our default setting, written in our DNA.

It is not merely on the basis of reason and logic that a person must find God. When we consider how often reason has led us astray, it behooves us to give more credence to instinctive childlike faith.  It could well help many to set off in the direction of home.

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Bread Pilled: Jordan Peterson turning young, Western men into Christians Again

God’s revival?

For the past year, lectures by the University of Toronto professor and psychiatrist have gone viral on YouTube and made Jordan Peterson a folk hero among young men on the right across the Western world.

Peterson has won over so many devoted fans not because of his eloquent and persuasive arguments against postmodernism and political correctness — there are lots of pundits and personalities on YouTube that eviscerate and expose these twin insidious systems.

What makes Peterson so uniquely special and what so endears him to his fans is that he is more concerned with turning boys into successful, highly functional men than he is in scoring political points or going viral. He’s a psychiatrist by trade and so many of his YouTube videos are of him giving life advice to young men on how to “sort themselves out” and find meaning. He’s a sort of father-figure for hundreds of thousands in this regard. All you need to do is read the comments on his videos: he has made a profound impact on the lives of so many young men.

To read the rest of this article, go to:
https://tipolitics.com/bread-pilled-jordan-peterson-turning-young-western-men-into-christians-again-58864fa39385