The Atheist’s Plight

looking at sunset 4 copy

He enjoys a meal while believing there is no chef.
He reads a book while denying it has an author.
He admires the sunset while asserting there is no sun.
He savors pleasure not knowing from whence it came.

He embarks on a journey without a map.
He travels into a desert where there is no oasis.
He plays on a sports-field that has no goalposts.
He assembles a puzzle with no picture to guide him.

He plays a role in a drama but ignores the play-writer.
He treasures life but ignores the life-giver.
He seeks for joy but dismisses the joy-giver.
He acknowledges laws but denies the law-giver.

When he is in need he has no one to pray to.
When he is grateful he has no one to thank.
He searches for meaning while rejecting its source.
He denies in his head what his heart knows to be true.

It behooves us to pray that the God in whom
he does not believe will come to his aid.

Advertisements

The Books Have An Author

47-Old-Library-Trinity-College-Library-Dublin-Dublin-Ireland

I am not an Atheist. I do not know if I can define myself as a Pantheist… We are in the position of a little child, entering a huge library whose walls are covered to the ceiling with books in many different tongues. The child knows that someone must have written those books. It does not know who or how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books, a mysterious order, which it does not comprehend, but only dimly suspects. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of the human mind, even the greatest and most cultured, toward God. We see a universe marvelously arranged, obeying certain laws, but we understand the laws only dimly.

–Albert Einstein

Logic Is A Tool, Not A Religion

gearsLogic may be viewed, perhaps, as a machine which is designed, at best, to be such that when we feed into it certain data and turn the logic crank, we inevitably get certain conclusions out the other end. Logic is designed to give inevitably true results starting from known true–or assumed-to-be-true–premises. Logic is a wonderful tool when we want only logical conclusions. We should not reject such a machine merely because it is not equipped to handle all of reality. The scientist who commits himself to use a logic machine is doing wisely, qua scientist, for use on data of science. But if he feeds into that machine convictions that there is no God, or ignores God because He is not in his corpus of data, and then draws from his logic the conclusion that God does not exist, his conclusion is irrelevant. Logic is a tool; it should not be made into a religion.

–Kenneth L. Pike,
With Heart and Mind