How Do We Explain Christianity?

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Christianity has inspired some of the world’s greatest music and arts, and has expanded education from the elite to the masses — even creating the entity of the university…

Prior to the coming of Christ, human life on this planet was expendable.
. . . In the ancient world, child sacrifice was a common practice. In ancient Rome, babies were often left to die if the father did not want them. Many Christians saved these babies and reared them in the Christian faith and helped turn the tide. Through His church, ultimately Jesus brought an end to infanticide in the Roman world.

Christianity also helped to cease the gladiatorial contests — where slaves would be forced to fight unto death for the entertainment of the crowds. And Christianity got slavery abolished in the ancient world and then again in the modern world.

Christianity managed to stop the practice in India of widow-burning. Many times a young girl would be married to an older man. When he died, she would be burned to death on his funeral pyre … until the missionaries agitated to put a stop to this. Wherever the Gospel has truly penetrated, the value of human life has greatly increased.

. . . Christianity and the Bible helped give birth to modern science, beginning in the late Middle Ages. The belief that a rational God had created a rational universe inspired so many scientists to engage in scientific exploration, looking to catalogue the laws the Creator had impressed upon His creation.

The early scientists thought of themselves as “thinking God’s thoughts after Him” (in the words of astronomer Johannes Kepler).

. . . Virtually all of the founders of every major branch of science were Bible-believing Christians. We document that in the book with a long list. One of those men, Sir Isaac Newton, was one of the greatest scientists who ever lived — and he was a committed believer who wrote more about the Bible and theology than he did about science.

– Jerry Newcombe
https://www.christianpost.com/voice/the-incredible-impact-of-jesus-christ.html

How Do We Explain The Laws of Logic?

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The whole scientific enterprise is based on certain assumptions which cannot be proved scientifically, but which are guaranteed by the Christian world view; for example: the laws of logic, the orderly nature of the external world, the reliability of our cognitive faculties in knowing the world, and the objectivity of the moral values used in science. I want to emphasize that science could not even exist without these assumptions, and yet these assumptions cannot be proved scientifically. They are philosophical assumptions which, interestingly, are part and parcel of a Christian world view. Thus, religion is relevant to science in that it can furnish a conceptual framework in which science can exist. More than that, the Christian religion historically did furnish the conceptual framework in which modern science was born and nurtured.

—William Lane Craig,
What is the Relation between Science and Religion?

How Do We Explain Math?

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In the atheist’s paradigm, only mutability or inconsistency exists. Anything that is immutable or consistent, such as a fixed point of reference, is incoherent in such a template… Since there is no opportunity for the existence of the attribute of immutability in an atheistic world, it then follows that that which is immutable by nature… cannot exist in the atheistic model…

Math, like God, has the attribute of immutability. It is unchanging. Therefore, it can be relied upon. It is the means by which proper thinking, science, and economics (amongst many other disciplines) may be accomplished. However, by virtue of its complete absence of immutability, atheism by default renders its view of reality and math as mutually exclusive. In other words, just as atheism and God are mutually exclusive, the atheistic paradigm and math also both cannot occur at the same time due to the essence of their opposite natures.

The Bible teaches us that there are no atheists. Every person knows that God exists (Romans 1:18-32) because every person is an image bearer of God (Genesis 1:26-27). Not only does the “atheist” know that God exists, but the “atheist” also knows that math exists. The “atheist,” true to his/her chaotic and incoherent worldview, attempts to have the mutually exclusive coexist. The “atheist” attempts to embrace math while denying its attribute of immutability.

http://theidolbabbler.com/2016/01/01/the-mutual-exclusivity-of-atheism-and-math/

You See What You Want To See

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Science is a mirror in which you see what you
want to see reflected back. The Nazis used science
to justify racial genocide. Liberals use to justify . . .
“let’s hug the world”. But both of them reflect the
cultural prejudices of the people who are looking
into the mirror of science.

–Thomas Holland,
English writer and historian

Co-opting Science

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The image of the scientist who puts the pursuit of truth
before anything else has been shattered and replaced by
a man on the make or a quasi-religious enthusiast who
wants to prove his case at any cost. Science is becoming
the tool of campaigning warfare, in which truth is the
first casualty.

– Paul Johnson

Einstein And The Cardinal

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The German mathematician Professor Hans Rohrbach tells of the following conversation between Cardinal Faulhaber, Archbishop of Munich, and Professor Albert Einstein.

“I respect religion, but believe in mathematics;” said Einstein, “doubtless for your Eminence the reverse is true.”

“You are mistaken;” replied Faulhaber, “religion and mathematics are for me only different ways of expressing the same Divine exactness.”

Einstein was astonished. “But what if one day mathematical research should show that certain verdicts of science contradict those of religion?”

“I have such a high regard for mathematics,” replied Faulhaber, “that in such a case you, Professor, would be under the obligation to never stop looking for the error in calculation.”

…Experience shows that faith in God’s Word has nothing at all to fear from serious thought. It would be useless to reject faith for the sake of natural science, or to abandon thought for the sake of faith. Faith does not need to prune the assertions of science nor does science need to blend the confessions of faith into shape. A sacrifice of one’s reason is not demanded. On the contrary, it is just the Bible which sees both together: creation and Creator, nature and revelation, the visible and the invisible…

It is necessary to look at both together and to see the harmony of both Divine revelations, the book of nature and the book of the written word.

– Eric Sauer,
The King of the Earth