I shall bet my life on the assumption…

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At least once every day I shall look steadily up at the sky and remember that I, a consciousness with a conscience, am on a planet traveling in space with wonderfully mysterious things above and about me.

Instead of the accustomed idea of a mindless and endless evolutionary change to which we can neither add nor subtract, I shall suppose the universe guided by an Intelligence which, as Aristotle said of Greek drama, requires a beginning, a middle, and an end. I think this will save me from the cynicism expressed by Bertrand Russell before his death when he said: “There is darkness without, and when I die there will be darkness within. There is no splendor, no vastness anywhere, only triviality for a moment, and then nothing.”

…Even if I turn out to be wrong, I shall bet my life on the assumption that this world is not idiotic, neither run by an absentee landlord, but that today, this very day, some stroke is being added to the cosmic canvas that in due course I shall understand with joy as a stroke made by the architect who calls himself Alpha and Omega.

–Clyde Kilby
American author and English professor

The Prophets are Falling

Darwin, Marx Freud

One by one the great prophets of materialism have been shown to be false prophets and have fallen aside. Marx and Freud have lost their scientific standing. Now Darwin is on the block. Some of us saw a clip of Richard Dawkins being interviewed on public television about his reaction to Michael Behe’s book. You can see how insecure that man is behind his bluster, and how much he has to rely on not having Mike Behe on the program with him, or even a lesser figure like Phil Johnson. Darwinists have to rely on confining their critics in a stereotype. They have learned to keep their own philosophy on the stage with no rivals allowed, and now they have to rely almost exclusively on that cultural power.

–Phillip E. Johnson,
How to Sink a Battleship

Eliminating “unnecessary” stuff

sawEvolution, when take to its logical conclusions, leaves no room for rationality, generosity, friendship, humanitarianism, meaning to life, God, or anything else that makes this life worth living.

According to mainstream biology textbooks, neo-Darwinism is a “random,” “blind,” “uncaring,” “heartless,” “undirected,” “purposeless,” and “chance,” process that acts “without plan” or “any goals,” and requires accepting “materialism” because we are “not created for any specific purpose or as part of any universal design,” where “a god of design and purpose is not necessary.”

-Casey Luskin

The Preposterous Notion

Amanecer màs alla de las colinas

A wonder it must be that there should be any man found so stupid as to persuade himself that this most beautiful world could be produced by the fortuitous concourse of atoms.

–John Ray (1627-1705), 
Founder of modern biology

The real reason for belief in evolution

monkey_evolution_falseEvolutionists adhere to a theory that admittedly is fraught with grave difficulties. For many academics and scientists the underlying reason for their commitment to evolution has little to do with science. It has a lot to do with the fact that the only alternative is believing in the “unthinkable” idea of a Divine Creator. Why the staunch belief in evolution? Here are some of their answers:

“… Only because it supposedly excludes a creator,” said Dr. Michael Walker, former senior lecturer in anthropology, University of Sydney.

“… Not because it can be proved by logically coherent evidence to be true but because the only alternative, special creation, is clearly incredible,” wrote the late D.M.S. Watson, chair of evolution at the University of London.

“Evolution is unproved and improvable, we believe it because the only alternative is special creation, which is unthinkable,” wrote the late Sir Arthur Keith, physical anthropologist and head of the Anatomy Department at London Hospital. 

Yet none puts it more plainly than Dr. George Wald, Nobel Prize winner and professor emeritus of biology at Harvard University. “I do not want to believe in God,” Wald admitted to Scientific American magazine. “Therefore I choose to believe in that which I know is scientifically impossible, spontaneous generation arising to evolution.”

Sir Julian Huxley, the late president of UNESCO and grandson of Darwin’s colleague Thomas Huxley, gave this reason: “I suppose the reason we leaped at the origin of species was because the idea of God interfered with our sexual mores,” he wrote.

“We objected to the morality because it interfered with our sexual freedom,” concurred his brother, the late author Aldous Huxley.